Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Lunar Eclipse, April 14, 2014

I happened to be awake during the lunar eclipse, so I took out my camera and finally found a setting that would let me capture it.  Here are 3 of the better photos.

That blue dot to the right of the moon is Spica.


The moon and Spica at the bottom, with Mars at the top.

Saturday, April 5, 2014

Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, March 2, 2014

My second day in Toronto was a solo day, as Bill and Christina had to drive home to New Jersey.  I had a basketball game to catch later that day, but I knew exactly how I wanted to spend the few hours I had prior to that = at the Art Gallery of Ontario, which (I believe) was closed the last two times I was in Toronto.  The museum is renowned as not just the best art museum in Canada, but one of the best in North America (and indeed, the world).  The only downside of my visit was that I was so saturated with their downstairs permanent collection that I had no energy to visit the upstairs contemporary section.  Ah well...

A look back at the CN Tower on my morning walk to the museum.

The Art Gallery of Ontario has a rather *unusual* facade.  That would be the upstairs contemporary section, which I wouldn't get to today.

It's almost like a mirage in the snowy landscape.

Today was the final day of The Great Upheaval, an exhibition from the Guggenheim Collection.  I wasn't allowed to take photos inside that exhibit, but it had Marc Chagall's "Paris Through the Window" and Franz Marc's "Yellow Cow," two of the most famous paintings from the immediately-pre-WWI time period.  Marc actually died fighting in WWI.

Now that I think on it, I don't think I actually climbed this stairwell inside.

Luca Giordano's "The Crucifixion of Saint Andrew" (c. 1700)

Master of the Kress Epiphany's "The Expulsion of the Money-Changers" (c. 1480-1500)

Pseudo-Bles' "The Queen of Sheba Visiting King Solomon" (c. 1515-1520)

The Jativa Master's "The Crucifixion" (c. late 1400s)

Gaspar de Crayer's "Saint Benedict Receiving Totila, King of the Ostrogoths" (1633)

Gaspar de Crayer's "The Admission of Saint Bernard to the Cistercian Order" (c. 1660)

Giuseppe Simonelli's "The Battle Between the Israelites and the Amalekites" (1689-90)

Pieter Claeissens the Elder's "Moses Breaking Pharaoh's Crown" (c. 1530-1572)

Detail of Pieter Claeissens the Elder's "Moses Breaking Pharaoh's Crown" (c. 1530-1572)

Detail of Pieter Claeissens the Elder's "Moses Breaking Pharaoh's Crown" (c. 1530-1572)

Detail of Pieter Claeissens the Elder's "Moses Breaking Pharaoh's Crown" (c. 1530-1572)

Detail of Pieter Claeissens the Elder's "Moses Breaking Pharaoh's Crown" (c. 1530-1572)

Detail of Pieter Claeissens the Elder's "Moses Breaking Pharaoh's Crown" (c. 1530-1572)

Tobias Verhaecht's "Mountain Landscape with Figures" (c. late 1500s, early 1600s)

Giorgio de Chirico's "Piazza d'Italia" (c. 1950)

Pablo Picasso's "Nude with Clasped Hands" (1905-06)

Henri Matisse's "Decorative Figure" (1908)

Amedeo Modigliani's "Portrait of Mrs. Hastings" (1915)

Marc Chagall's "Over Vitebsk" (1914)

Georges Rouault's "Woman in Profile: Circus Girl" (c. 1935)

Jules Pascin's "Reclining Nude" (c. 1920)

Some of the galleries were arranged in this manner.

Eugene Boudin's "Beach Near Trouville" (1864)

Camille Pissarro's "Pont Boieldieu in Rouen, Damp Weather" (1896)

Alfred Sisley's "View of Marly-le-Roi: Sunlight" (1876)

Edgar Degas' "Woman at Her Bath" (c. 1895)

Auguste Rodin's "Adam" (1861; cast c. 1929, posthumously)

Claude Monet's "Etretat: L'Aiguille and the Porte d'Aval" (1885-86)

Paul Gauguin's "The Sleeping Child" (1884)

Pierre-Auguste Renoir's "The Seine at Chatou" (c. 1871)

Vincent Van Gogh's "Woman with a Spade, Seen from Behind" (1885)

William Adolphe Bouguereau's "Study of a Girl's Head" (c. 1890)

Anton Mauve's "Woodcutters" (c. 1880)

Luigi Bazzani's "The Arch of Septimius Severus, Rome" (1900)

Paul Peel's "The Young Biologist" (1891)

Rosa Bonheur's "Oxen" (date unknown; Bonheur lived between 1822 and 1899)

Jules Cave's "Martyr in the Catacombs" (1886)

Jules Cave's "Martyr in the Catacombs" (1886)

William Blake Richmond's "Electra at the Tomb of Agamemnon" (1874)

Pierre Puvis de Chavannes' "Bathers" (c. 1890)

Augustus John's "The Marchesa Casati" (1919)

Homer Watson's "The Death of Elaine" (1877)

Sigismund Christian Hubert Goetze's "The Ever Open Door" (1906)

John William Waterhouse's "'I am half sick of shadows,' said The Lady of Shalott" (1915)

Claude Monet's "Vetheuil in Summer" (1879)

Paul Cezanne's "Interior of a Forest" (c. 1885)

Paul Cezanne's "Interior of a Forest" (c. 1885)

Claude Lorrain's "The Embarkation of Carlo and Ubaldo" (1667)

Nicolas Poussin's "Venus, Mother of Aeneas, Presenting Him with Arms Forged by Vulcan" (c. 1636-37)

Thomas Gainsborough's "The Harvest Wagon" (1784-85)

Emily Carr's "Hagwilgate" (1912-13); I first discovered Carr's work on my first visit to British Columbia in 2002.

Henri Manguin's "The Marina, Marseille" (1925-26)

Raoul Dufy's "Hyeres Square, the Obelisk and the Bandstand" (1927)

Pierre Bonnard's "Landscape, Southern France" (1916 - c. 1918)

Pablo Picasso's "Seated Woman" (1927)

Otto Dix's "Portrait of Dr. Heinrich Stadelmann" (1922).  Nothing says "unsettling" like an Otto Dix painting... except maybe a George Grosz painting.

Chuck Close's "Kent" (1970-71); this is a painting and not a photograph.  Any resemblance to Peter Dinklage is presumably coincidental.  ;-)

Meditative time in the pre-renaissance section.

Diptych: The Passion of Christ, and the Three Marys at the Sepulchre (1325-1350, ivory, Northern France)


Diptych: St. George, and Virgin and Child (c. 1500, Ethiopia)

Scenes from the Story of St. George (c. 1520, Netherlands)

These came from various countries, mainly in Asia.  I neglected to record the information.



Peter Paul Rubens' "Six Anatomical Studies" (c. 1600-1610)

Peter Paul Rubens' "Six Anatomical Studies" (c. 1600-1610) [note - I don't think I rotated this one correctly]

Peter Paul Rubens' "Six Anatomical Studies" (c. 1600-1610)

Peter Paul Rubens' "Six Anatomical Studies" (c. 1600-1610)

Peter Paul Rubens' "Six Anatomical Studies" (c. 1600-1610)

Peter Paul Rubens' "Six Anatomical Studies" (c. 1600-1610)

Peter Paul Rubens' "The Massacre of the Innocents" (1611-12)

Detail of Peter Paul Rubens' "The Massacre of the Innocents" (1611-12)

Detail of Peter Paul Rubens' "The Massacre of the Innocents" (1611-12)


That's a ton of miniature busts... they're all by Benjamin Cheverton (1794-1876).




Bernard Van Orley's "Rest on the Flight into Egypt" (c. 1518)

Gian Lorenzo Bernini's "The Crucified Christ (Corpus) (c. 1655)

Workshop of Andrea del Sarto's "The Madonna and Child with Infant St. John and Children" (16th century)

Canadian artist William Kurelek's "'Who is She that Cometh Forth as the Morning Riseth?'" (1962)

Giovanni del Biondo's "Saint Benedict Restores Life to a Young Monk" (14th century)

Bartolommeo de Giovanni's "Lamentation with Saints and a Donor" (c. 1490)

Detail of Bartolommeo de Giovanni's "Lamentation with Saints and a Donor" (c. 1490)

Master of Foces' "St. John and the Two Disciples of the Philosopher Craton" (c. 1300)

Aelbert Bouts' "Virgin and Child" (15th/16th century)

Gabriel Metsu's "View into a Hall with a Jester, a Girl and her Dog" (c. 1667, the year of Metsu's death)

Arent Arentsz., aka "Cabel"'s "Skaters on the Amstel" (c. 1620-1625)

Jan Van Goyen's "View of Rhenen" (1641)

Rembrandt Harmensz. Van Rijn's "Portrait of a Lady with a Lap Dog" (c. 1665)

Aelbert Cuyp's "View of Dordrecht" (c. 1655)

Anthony Van Dyck's "Michel Le Blon" (c. 1630-1635)

Circle of Rembrandt's "Portrait of a Seated Woman with a Handkerchief" (c. 1644)

Chaim Soutine's "Piece of Beef" (1923, based on a Rembrandt painting)

Frans Snyders and Cornelis de Vos' "Evisceration of a Roebuck with a Portrait of a Married Couple" (c. 1625)

Frans Hals' "Isaak Abrahamsz. Massa" (1626)

Pieter Brueghel the Younger's "Nine Netherlandish Proverbs" (or as I like to think of it, an imitation of Mannekin Pis) (16th/17th century)

Frans Hals' "Vincent Laurensz. van der Vinne" (c. 1655-1660)

Thomas Lawrence's "Portrait of Hart Hart-Davis" (after 1820)

Time for some art by the Group of Seven, Canada's most famous artistic collective.  This is Lawren S. Harris' "Winter Woods" (1915).

Lawren S. Harris' "Figure with Rays of Light (Arctic Group III)" (c. 1927)

Lawren S. Harris' "Lake Superior" (c. 1923)

Lawren S. Harris' "Untitled Mountain Landscape" (c. 1927-28)

Emily Carr's "Thunderbird" (1931) (note that she was not in the Group of Seven, despite being a contemporary)

Emily Carr's "Gitwangak" (1912)

Emily Carr's "Yellow Moss" (c. 1932-34)

Emily Carr's "In a Circle" (1931)

James Wilson Morrice's "Dusk, Venice" (1904)

James Wilson Morrice's "Le Quai des Grands-Augustins (Winter)" (1905)

Cornelius Krieghoff's "Fat Man Drinking, Blue Toque" (19th century)

Clarence Gagnon's "Wayside Cross, Winter" (1916)

Joseph Legare's "Montmorency Falls in Winter" (1850)

Alex Colville's "Soldier and Girl at Station" (1953)

William Kurelek's "Reminiscences of Youth" (1968)

William Kurelek's "Reminiscences of Youth" (1968) = note that the frame is part of the painting.

A.Y. Jackson's  "Yellowknife Country" (1929)

F.H. Varley's "Immigrants" (c. 1922)

Some info about The Group of Seven

Franklin Carmichael's "Light and Shadow" (1937)

A.J. Casson's "Ice Hummocks" (1924)

Franz (Frank) Johnston's "Hubert Lake" (1918)

Franklin Carmichael's "Festive Autumn" (1921)

Franklin Carmichael's "Cranberry Lake" (1931)

Arthur Lismer's "A Clear Winter" (1916)

David Milne's "Maine Monument" (c. 1913)

William Kurelek's "The Rock" (1962)

William Kurelek's "The Rock" (1962)

One of the coolest parts of the museum was their collection of vintage model boats, downstairs.  This is a Georgian model of a British two-decker 70 gun warship, Edinburgh (1721).

Builder's model of a British armoured steam cruiser, HMS Hogue (1900)

Model of First Class Cruiser Leviathan (date not recorded)

Model of First Class Cruiser Leviathan (date not recorded)

Builder's model of the British iron ship Melpomene (1876)

Back outside the museum, it was time to get some food before heading to the Toronto Raptors vs. Golden State Warriors game.

I would find it on this street (and not underneath the gigantic Corona bottle).

Brisk day, by the way.

I wasn't in Quebec, but I still had a hankering for poutine.  Smoke's Poutinerie (a chain) allegedly had some good stuff.

Because it was the day before Orthodox Lent, I got the vegetarian version.  Still disgustingly delicious.

Coming up = the Golden State Warriors @ Toronto Raptors.  Stay tuned.